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B

Bumping +2 tablets can be bumped together to trigger dynamic tiling of their displays. Picking up a tablet disconnects the displays. Holding the tablets at an angle during the bump triggers pouring data from one device to another.  +

C

Chucking +Chucking is the act of mimicking physically throwing your device in some direction like chucking playing cards. Done while pressing your finger to a piece of data, it sends that data from your private device to a public screen for display.  +
Codex +Codex is a dual-screen device that allows for private and collaborative use according to the configuration you put it in, from private to social.  +
Conductor +Conductor allows for multi-device usage by broadcasting cues to all devices in a group. Cues can be clicked to open the information on the most appropriate application or dragged across the screen to a list of possible functions to be performed with this cue. This generates a Duet between two devices, so any change in one device reflects on the other.  +
ConnecTable +ConnecTables are mobile workplaces with articulated screens that can be joined in common workspaces by touching their sides together. Objects can then be viewed and shared in these joint workspaces.  +
Cross-Device Drag-and-Drop +Allows user to drag objects between devices by a continuous dragging operation, dropping it at the destination device  +
Cross-Device Pinch-to-Zoom +Based on proxemics, micro-mobility and f-formations, these techniques depend on the social code of gestures for data sharing: tilt your screen towards some else's and you'll share a preview of your data, face your device to a public screen and it will mirror your device's contents, drag or zoom data across your bezel and it will cross a Portal towards your neighbor's device.  +

D

DisplayStacks +DisplayStacks are paper-like screens that can be arranged in piles, stacks or fans, or collated side-by-side or slightly overlapping. Each arrangement prompts the stack to react accordingly, allowing for different interactions.  +
Drag-and-Pick +These techniques allow for shorter Drag-and-Drops by moving the target icons closer to the cursor. Drag-and-Pop brings all applications related to the file being dragged closer to the mouse while Drag-and-Pick brings all available icons closer to the mouse to allow for easy selection.  +
Drag-and-Pop +These techniques allow for shorter Drag-and-Drops by moving the target icons closer to the cursor. Drag-and-Pop brings all applications related to the file being dragged closer to the mouse while Drag-and-Pick brings all available icons closer to the mouse to allow for easy selection.  +

E

EasyGroups +EasyGroups allow for ad-hoc group creation by bumping devices together. After collaboration, flipping the first phone in the group down will disband the group.  +

F

Face-to-Mirror the Full Screen +Based on proxemics, micro-mobility and f-formations, these techniques depend on the social code of gestures for data sharing: tilt your screen towards some else's and you'll share a preview of your data, face your device to a public screen and it will mirror your device's contents, drag or zoom data across your bezel and it will cross a Portal towards your neighbor's device.  +

H

HandLaser +HandMouse, HandLaser, HeadMouse, and HeadLaser are 4 variations of using your hand or your head as either a cursor or a motion tracker - each has its own shortcomings and advantages depending if you aim for familiarity or augmentation.  +
HandMouse +HandMouse; HandLaser; HeadMouse and HeadLaser are 4 variations of using your hand or your head as either a cursor or a motion tracker - each has its own shortcomings and advantages depending if you aim for familiarity or augmentation.  +
HeadLaser +HandMouse, HandLaser, HeadMouse, and HeadLaser are 4 variations of using your hand or your head as either a cursor or a motion tracker - each has its own shortcomings and advantages depending if you aim for familiarity or augmentation.  +
HeadMouse +HandMouse, HandLaser, HeadMouse, and HeadLaser are 4 variations of using your hand or your head as either a cursor or a motion tracker - each has its own shortcomings and advantages depending if you aim for familiarity or augmentation.  +
Hyperdrag +Hyperdrag expands the limits of the mouse beyond the screen bezel, allowing the cursor to drag across entire workspaces - including tables and walls.  +

I

Interface Currents +Interface currents allow for collaboration by moving objects in a constant flow around a workspace. Items can be collected into pools or put into streams to move them to other parts of the shared screen.  +

L

Lift-and-Drop +Lift and Drop extends Pick-and-Drop by tracking hand motion and reproducing it on the display, allowing for visual feedback like regular Drag-and-Drop  +

M

MobiES +MobiES allows users to interact with data contained in a mobile device on a larger screen by detecting the proximity between the two and expanding the mobile's interface into the screen. More devices can be connected so you can share information between them.  +
MultiSpace +MultiSpace moves data across devices through portals - graphical proxies to other devices in the same network. To display something on another device, just drag it to the corresponding portal.  +

P

PaperVideo +In PaperVideo, paper-like displays are used not only to project the interfaces on, but as interface elements themselves: sliding two displays against each other or using the tip of one display as a pointer in another display, bumping displays together etc.  +
Perspective-Aware Interfaces +Perspective-Aware interfaces take into consideration where the user's head is positioned in relation to the displays, enhancing visibility of interface elements on oddly-oriented displays.  +
Pick-and-Drop +Allows users to pick up an object on a display and drop it on another display similarly to how physical objects would be manipulated.  +
Pinch +Using the gesture normally associated with zooming, but across two devices, Pinch stitches two screens together in a single workspace.  +
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IDLAB - Institute of Informatics, Tallinn University